How are Accredited Exercise Physiologists different?

How are AEPs different from Physiotherpists?

A Physiotherapist usually provides services (but not limited to) such as joint manipulation, soft tissue mobilisation (massage), acupuncture, dry needling, hydrotherapy, exercise to improve mobility and muscle strength (including acute rehabilitation), muscle re-education, sports injury prevention and assistance with using crutches, splints, and walking sticks.

 

An Accredited Exercise Physiologist usually provides services (but not limited to) such as prescribing exercise to help manage chronic medical conditions and chronic injury, improve mobility and muscle strength including falls prevention, exercise and lifestyle support for those at risk of chronic disease, rehabilitation following injury or surgery (most likely after physiotherapy intervention) and health education and support to enhance wellbeing.

 

How are AEPs different from Personal Trainers?

Accredited Exercise Physiologists (AEPs) are not Personal Trainers. AEPs are allied-health professionals with Medicare Provider numbers and are trained members of the health and medical sector. Fitness professionals (e.g. personal trainers) are members of the sport and recreation sector. Personal trainers are qualified and insured to design and deliver fitness programs to persons of low risk only (i.e. “apparently healthy populations”).